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All Blue

November 22, 2010

The Celebrity Summit hoisted anchor at 5:00 on Friday. The four of us assembled at the ship’s fantail to watch her back out of the harbor and head for the open sea. She cut a wide arc as she backed out and then she left a large wake as she pulled out. The sky was an amazing shade of blue; the sun was setting and painted a swath of vivid reds and oranges. There was a shout of “Hurrah!” and the pop of champagne corks and we were on our way back to San Juan.

 

We made our way back to our stateroom and got dressed for dinner. We noted the ship was traveling a bit faster than before and there was a distinct rocking and rolling and wondered if this pace would continue until we arrived in San Juan Saturday morning. We arrived at the Cosmopolitan and were greeted by the friendly, smiling servers holding hand sanitizers—just in case you forgot to wash. We made our way to our table and started sharing our day’s adventures with our tablemates. They had hired a naturalist to take them around Tobago and show them bird sanctuaries and waterfalls the rest of us had missed.

The next morning we woke to a most beautiful site. The sky was a beautiful shade of blue, the sea a deeper hue, rich and velvety. I mentioned to Mike—“we’re enveloped in blue”. He smiled and began “Tangled up in blue”, then “All blue” as he listed songs with ‘blue’ in the title. “Better yet” he smiled “Rhapsody in Blue”. I laughed and we made our way to the Waterfall Café for breakfast—everybody wanted one more morning of Belgian waffles.

As we sat at our table, a man next to us pointed out the ‘small silver things’ leaping out of the water. “What are those?” he questioned. Somebody near him said that they were a school of flying fish. “No way!” I said, but that is exactly what they were. They continued to leap out of the water, sunlight glinting off their small wet bodies. As they jumped, a masked booby followed and snatched one out of the water for a tasty breakfast.

I had never seen flying fish, nor a masked booby, but others had, and soon we were getting biology lesson from the seasoned sailors around us. Masked boobies travel for hundreds of miles, we learned, following ships at sea. It was true, the four flying friends that joined us at breakfast could be seen next to the ship the entire day. At times they would dive straight into the water then pop up on a wave as if the sea were spitting them out like watermelon seeds. We watched them for a very long time.

We spent the day walking through the ship, at times the rocking and rolling were a bit much, and I would feel slightly queasy. It was strange to be on the ship and to see only blue when we looked out. It became so mesmerizing, that I found myself simply staring out at all that blue, content in the calmness of it all.

There was a brunch complete with ice and fruit sculptures and massive amounts of food. Dave and Darlene joined us in the dining room for a quick bite to eat. The Summits’ servers were in rare form meeting our every need even before we knew we had a need. We had become spoiled by the attention of the servers and knew that we would always remember their close attention to detail, their friendly and funny conversation and their dedication to detail. In a very real way, they had made our cruise experience a most memorable one and we couldn’t thank them enough.

Watermelon Sculpture in the Cosmopolitan Dining Room

Ravesel and Siu, our servers

That evening Dave, Darlene, Mike and myself took advantage of the thalassotherapy pool—a type of saltwater whirlpool. The rocking and rolling of the ship, and the jets in the pool made for a most interesting wave action and soon all of our aches and pains were gone. We parted company and Mike and I celebrated our last evening on the ship with our bottle of champagne. The next morning we would be in San Juan, and the cruise would be over. So, for a few more hours, we would soak in the stars, the sea, and the Summit.

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